New Users Registration  |  Useful Links  |  FAQ  |  Site Map 
 
Go Search

 

Skip Navigation LinksHealth Xchange > News
  News  
  Categories  
     
  Chronology  
 
  2013 2014   Dec 2014 | Nov 2014 | Oct 2014 | Sep 2014 | Aug 2014 | Jul 2014 | Jun 2014 | May 2014 | Apr 2014 | Mar 2014 | Feb 2014 | Jan 2014 |
  2013   Dec 2013 | Nov 2013 | Oct 2013 | Sep 2013 | Aug 2013 | Jul 2013 | Jun 2013 | May 2013 | Apr 2013 | Mar 2013 | Feb 2013 | Jan 2013 |
  2012   Dec 2012 | Nov 2012 | Oct 2012 | Sep 2012 | Aug 2012 | Jul 2012Jun 2012May 2012Apr 2012Mar 2012 | Feb 2012 | Jan 2012 |
  2011   Dec 2011Nov 2011Oct 2011 | Sep 2011 | Aug 2011Jul 2011Jun 2011 | May 2011 | Apr 2011 | Mar 2011 | Feb 2011 | Jan 2011 |
  2010   Dec 2010 | Nov 2010 | Oct 2010 | Sep 2010 | Aug 2010 | Jul 2010 | Jun 2010 | May 2010 | Apr 2010 | Mar 2010 | Feb 2010 | Jan 2010 |
  2009   Dec 2009 | Nov 2009 | Oct 2009 | Sep 2009 | Aug 2009 |
 
     
  Topic  
 
  Health Policy and Announcements | Diseases and Outbreaks
  Medical Research | New Treatments and Technology
   
 
     
  RSS  
 
  Singapore   SingHealth | Health Promotion Board | Ministry of Health | Asiaone
  International   World Health Organization | Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (US)
       
 
     
  News Article  
 

Singapore teenagers affected too

 
  Thursday, 19 l 08 l 2010 Source:  The Straits Times   
By: Lee Hui Chieh
     
 

listening to loud musicTHE growing trend of US teenagers losing their hearing probably applies to Singapore ones too, as lifestyles in both countries are similar, said Associate Professor Low Wong Kein, a senior consultant in the Singapore General Hospital’s otolaryngology department. One of the main causes of hearing loss is exposure to excessively loud noise over prolonged periods, Prof Low said. “Leisure-related activities in young people like the use of MP3s and frequenting discotheques are probably important factors,” he said.

Such activities, and ageing, will cause the cochlear hair cells in the ear – which enable one to hear and cannot be regenerated – to degenerate permanently.

It is not known how common hearing loss is among teenagers here, as no studies have been done recently.

Associate Professor Lynne Lim, director of the Centre for Hearing Intervention and Language Development at the National University Hospital, noted that the harmful effects of listening to loud music may not be apparent in younger people yet, as these emerge gradually only after years of consistent exposure.

The safe level of noise exposure without ear plugs is up to 85dB – the level of traffic noise on the road – for up to eight hours, she said.

She advised people to avoid listening to very loud music, and wear hearing protective devices if
they know they will be exposed to loud noises.

They should also go for a hearing test every year if they are exposed to loud noise consistently.

     
  Ask the Specialists - Free Doctor Q&A
(Now - 31st Jul)
 
    Stress and Anxiety
If you have questions on stress and anxiety, take this opportunity to ask our specialist today.
 
    Previous Q&As
Check out our archive for all our previous doctor's Q&As!
*Latest Update: Feet Problems, Women's Skin Conditions
 
e-Appointment Online
Health Buddy App